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2002
ANNUAL REPORT
2
Letter from the Chief J
Letter fr
udge
om the Chief J




3
Wheels of J

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Wheels of Ju
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4



Jurisdiction



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urisdiction


5
Key Messages
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12



Judiciary



J

udiciary


15

Supplemental Judicial Resour
Supplemental J
ces
udicial Resour

ces

able of Contents

T 16 Administrati

v
Administrati e
v Offi
e Of ce of the Courts
fi



1 9
2002 Highlights






25

Fiscal Summary and Budget




27
Circuit Filings



Circuit

Filings






28

As the

Wheels of J
As the
ustice
Wheels of J
T
ustice u
T r
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Cover Theme

Mechanical gears rotate with the gavel serving as the driving force, illustrating the "wheels of justice" at work. The sprockets in the
background bring life to architectural renderings from the new courthouse facility, which began construction in 2001.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
1



Dear Friends,
After serving two years as your chief judge, I can tell you that the "wheels of justice"
continue to grind because of dedicated public servants, whose diverse talents allow the
courts to continue to fulfi ll their constitutional obligations to the citizens across Hillsborough
County. The court system is not a machine; therefore, much of our attention in 2002 has been
devoted to meeting the challenges associated with the constitutional amendment, commonly
referred to as Revision 7, as we prepare for the signifi cant fi scal demands associated with
serving our constituents, guaranteeing "justice for all."
The Thirteenth Judicial Circuit has a fruitful history of cultivating cutting edge programs
and services. Yet in 2002 we began to forecast the impact that the shift in funding for
courts across the state will have in our circuit. To that end, it is possible that some of the
programs and services you will read about in this report will disappear by the next annual
report publication. Not only will you see accomplishments chronicled throughout this report,
you will also note indication of performance-based measures throughout the Administrative
Offi ce of the Courts. I am hopeful that as you peruse this summary report you will be
reminded of the impact that the courts have on your life, your family, your neighborhood,
your business.

The challenges we face in the coming year can be met as we work together to ensure our courts are adequately funded
and that we continue to provide "justice for all Floridians." The judges and court staff are working diligently to ensure that our
justice system functions fairly, effectively and effi ciently in our circuit and across the state. I encourage you to participate in
the future planning of your court services. You can start by learning more about what the courts do and how they affect your
family and community: review this report, log onto our website and contact us for additional information.

We look forward to working with you this year because it is an honor to serve our fellow citizens in the judicial branch
of government. On behalf of my colleagues in the judiciary and the Administrative Offi ce of the Courts staff, we are committed
to serving you faithfully.









With
kindest
regards,
udge
Manuel
Menendez,
Jr.
Chief
Judge
om the Chief J
Letter fr
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
2





Fifty-two judges currently serve the more than one million citizens of Hillsborough County.
More than 340,000 cases were fi led in this circuit in 2002.
The average ratio of judges to cases was 1 to 6,710.
Read inside for a glimpse of how the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit met the needs of this community in 2002.
The Wheels of Justice.......
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
3




Jurisdiction
JURISDICTION
American democracy depends on independent courts, as the
A vibrant waterfront area, Hillsborough County is home to more
public looks to the judicial branch of government as a forum of
than one million residents, offering a unique blend of urban and
fairness and impartiality, where decisions are based on the facts
rural areas. Tampa is the third most populous city in Florida,
and the rule of law. A key function of the rules is to prevent,
while Hillsborough County is the fourth most populous county
or at least minimize human confl ict. The law fulfi lls a basis of
but is the second largest employment market in the state with
resolving disputes; therefore, the court system touches the lives of
over 22,500 business establishments. Tampa's port is the seventh
all citizens.
largest port in the nation, with phosphate, shrimp and cruise lines
operating today. The Tampa Bay area also serves the second
While there are twenty judicial circuits in Florida, citizens in
largest television market in the state.
Hillsborough County are served by the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit,
the fi fth largest trial court jurisdiction in the state. The courts
Our courts have many responsibilities to the citizens of
strive to meet the growing demand for justice related services in
Hillsborough County. The work of the courts directly impacts
Hillsborough County; therefore, as the population increases, so
public safety, business and commerce and the welfare of our
does the caseload in the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit. In fact, while
children and families.
the population has grown more than 20 percent since 1994, the
caseload has increased almost 60 percent.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
4







KEY MESSAGES
The court system touches all of our lives. Several key points explain why our courts are so important to each of us.


Our courts protect democracy

Our courts safeguard victims' rights, determine guilt or innocence of the accused, and impose appropriate
punishment

Our courts resolve personal, business and property disputes, and

Our courts protect children, families, the elderly and the infi rm
Our courts protect democracy by:

upholding the law,
Filings in Circuit and County Court

ensuring individual rights and liberties,

enforcing public order, and

providing for a peaceful resolution of disputes.
350,000
342,373
323,796
300,000
305,615
310,050
271,632
292,171
260,165
250,000 254,722
Almost 60,000 cases were fi led in circuit courts in 2002;
200,000
this signifi es an increase of more than 7 percent in the last
fi ve years. These cases impact every aspect of modern
150,000
society, ranging from juvenile and adult crime to divorce,
100,000
paternity, adoption, child custody and child support cases to
civil disputes. In addition, more than 280,000 cases were fi led
50,000
in county courts in 2002.
0
`95 `96 `97 `98 `99 `00 `01 `02
Hillsborough County Security reported that people passed
through the magnetometers more than 3.5 million times in
2002. Each weekday average is almost 170,000 times, with
almost half of the traffi c occurring at the Courthouse Annex.
The Administrative Offi ce of the Courts, Offi ce of Public
Information, reported that people logged on the courts' website
at www.fl jud13.org an average of 37,000 times each month.
Average Weekday Entrance in
Courthouse Facilities
700 Twiggs Street: 1,200
Home to the 2003 Super Bowl Champions, Tampa Bay
Plant City Courthouse: 700
Buccaneers, Raymond James Stadium can be fi lled more
Courthouse Annex: 4,600
than 2.5 times, if each seat represents each case fi led in 2002.
Main Courthouse: 3,500
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
5





KEY MESSA
Alternative Dispute Resolution
2002 Referrals
Family
Criminal
GES
Circuit Civil
From the bench in the Plant City courthouse, Judge Stoddard
County Civil
Community
resolves cases in both Family Law and Civil divisions.
Alternative dispute resolution offered at least 25,000 litigants
Dependency
an opportunity for greater self-determination regarding the fi nal
outcome of their cases; the overall resolution rate for mediation
was 55 percent. The County Civil division received the largest
percentage of referrals (44 percent), followed by the Family Law
division with 33 percent of the referrals.
Our courts, working with other criminal justice
partners, safeguard victims' rights, determine guilt
or innocence of the accused, and impose appropriate
punishment.
More than 14,000 criminal cases were fi led in circuit courts in
2002. These include felony crimes such as murder, sexual assault,
robbery, burglary, theft and forgery. Almost one-third of these
cases involve drug offenses. In addition, almost 11,000 complaints
were fi led involving offenses committed by juveniles. Moreover,
almost 40,000 misdemeanor cases were fi led in the County Criminal
division.

Criminal Justice & Trial Division
14,302 Filings
Judge Heinrich appears in jail via closed circuit
television in the First Appearance Division.
The gateway offense for teens is shoplifting, evidenced by
Other Felonies
petit theft crimes which represented 60 percent of referrals
in the Juvenile and Diversionary Programs. Arbitration
Drug Crimes
received more than 3,000 referrals in 2002, representing
28 percent of the cases in the Juvenile Delinquency
division; sanctions each month averaged 965 community
service work hours. More than 500 students, representing
Property Crimes
20 Hillsborough County public and private schools,
volunteered 3,250 hours in Teen Court. SHOCK Education
program received more than 230 referrals, providing fi rst-
and-second-time offenders a look at the non-glamorous
Violent Crimes
side of crime and delinquent behavior.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
6





KEY MESSA
The Indigent Screening Unit interviewed more
than 27,000 defendants at the jails, with more
than 50 percent of the interviews required for
preparation of First Appearance court each day.
Almost 130,000 subpoenas were issued in criminal
cases. Witness Aid Center staff contacted law
GES
enforcement and citizens to provide information on
the status of trials and court appearances; almost
12,000 individuals were placed on stand-by.
ISU staff complete affi davits for defendants in criminal court proceedings.
One out of fi ve defendants is Spanish speaking. Court Interpreter staff and Freelance Professionals provided interpreting services
for more than 14,000 cases in 2002. Providing services in more than forty foreign languages and dialects, the most commonly used
languages in this circuit were Spanish, American Sign Language, Haitian Creole, Vietmanese and Korean.
More than 2,800 offenders received intensive judicial and community
supervision, in addition to drug treatment and regular treatment while under
the jurisdiction of the Drug Court Divisions. Drug Court Program staff
completed 1,334 initial substance abuse evaluations and more than 3,000
follow-up substance abuse evaluations. To assist with judicial supervision,
a Special Master heard 3,460 compliant case review hearings.
Through the Drug Court Pre-Trial Intervention Program, 274 new defendants
had the opportunity to participate in this diversionary program. During
2002, 137 participants graduated. For the more than one-half of the
participants who successfully complete the program, the recidivism rate is
only 18 percent, indicating the program is successfully diverting people
from the criminal justice system. Statistical reviews indicate that more
than 85 percent of graduates from the Juvenile Drug Court Program do not
re-enter the criminal justice system.
Judge Espinosa congratulates recent graduate
from the PTI Drug Court Program
Almost 12,000 batterers entered the Hillsborough County Domestic Violence Intervention Program from 1995-2000, according to a
report issued by the James and Jennifer Harrell Center for the Study of Family Violence, published in 2002. More than two-thirds of
batterers ordered to the classes completed the programs. The overall recidivism rate was 8.9 percent for individuals who completed
intervention programs in Hillsborough County as compared to an overall recidivism rate of 23 percent for those who did not complete
their program. Private providers contract with the courts to administer intervention programs.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
INTERVENTION PROVIDERS
Brandon
Psychiatric
Associates


Western Judicial Batterers Intervention Program


Joni C. Stewart and Associates


Psychological Management Group


The Spring of Tampa Bay
Clients
of
Enterprise
Intervention
Dr. Martha Coulter consulted with the courts on Domestic Violence Programs.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
7



Our courts resolve personal, business and property disputes.
KEY MESSA
GES
Judge Vogel dispenses justice from Plant City courthouse.
The business community is a major user of the justice system, therefore the court system is essential for business and commerce and
directly affects the economy of Hillsborough County. In addition to civil traffi c infractions, there were more than 44,000 civil cases
fi led in our court system in 2002. In the Circuit Civil division, almost half of the cases involved mortgage foreclosures and contract
disputes, representing a 22 percent increase in case fi lings since 2001. In the County Civil division, fi lings in small claims cases
grew almost 20 percent.
Circuit Civil Division
County Civil Division
11,316 Filings
31,165 Filings
Other Civil
Other
Eminent Domain
Evictions
Mortgage Foreclosure
Replevins
Civil
Contract/Indebtedness
Other Negligence
Small Claims
Auto Negligence
Product Liability
Professional Malpractice
One out of every 40 people in Hillsborough County had the
opportunity to participate in one of the Mediation and Diversion
County Civil Mediations
Services. Almost 300 cases were referred to Circuit Civil Mediation;
hearings resulted in a 48 percent resolution rate. More than 5,000
cases were referred to the County Civil division, resulting in a
43 percent resolution rate. Another 2,000 cases were referred to
community mediation. These cases heard averaged a 67 percent
resolution rate. Cases mediated at the South County Justice Center
had the highest resolution rate at 76 percent.
Almost 48,000 hearings related to traffi c arraignments and other
city and county ordinances were heard by contractors in the Civil
Traffi c Hearing Offi cer Program. Night court offers many citizens
Contract
the opportunity to resolve their cases during non-traditional hours,
Miscellaneous
which do not interfere with their work schedule or other routine
Auto Repair
confl icts during the day. More than 70 percent of parking violations
Landlord/Tenant
heard were issued by the City of Tampa. Water violations exceeded
Recovery Money/Property
500 cases in June, July, October and December.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
8




Our courts protect families, children, the elderly and the infi rm.
Whether a shelter petition in the Dependency division, a
Guardianship proceeding or custodial dispute in the Family KEY MESSA
Law division, our courts have a responsibility to protect
vulnerable citizens.
More than one-third of the case fi lings in circuit court were
in the Family Law and the Juvenile Dependency divisions,
representing almost 22,000 fi lings in 2002. Filings for
domestic violence and repeat injunctions have increased GES
more than one-third in fi ve years. In addition, more than
4,400 annual reviews were heard for guardianship cases.
Mediation offered an alternative dispute resolution for parties
in 4,000 cases in the Family Law division. Modifi cations
of dissolution agreements comprised 65 percent of the cases
mediated, while child support represented the second largest
Judge Simms and HCBA President Marian McCulloch, shaped
issue with 15 percent of the cases. More than two-thirds of
happy memories at General Master Farkas' retirement party
these mediations resulted in agreement.
in June 2003.
General Masters assisted Family Law
Filings from Family Law Division
judges with more than 3,000 modifi cations
2002
and other reopened cases related to
dissolutions and domestic relations.
Part of the court's responsibility is to ensure that cases
involving children are given adequate and appropriate
Repeat Violence
attention. In 2002, there were more than 10,000 foster care
Domestic Violence
review hearings in the Juvenile Dependency division; that is
more than four times the amount of reviews just ten years
Domestic Relations
ago.
UIFSA
Child Support
To assist in the backlog of cases in the Juvenile Dependency
division, a Rocket Docket was instituted in the winter
months. Joining Chief Judge Menendez, Judges Baumann,
Dissolution
Bergmann, Foster, and Levens presided over adjudication
and termination of parental rights trials. Each judge reserved
Simplifi ed Dissolution
a week to hear trials, as well as preside over disposition and
permanency hearings.
Most Family Law cases across the state have at least
one party who is not represented by an attorney.
Although Florida courts cannot offer legal advice
to self-represented litigants, programs have been
established to help them navigate through the legal
system. The Family Intake Unit set almost 3,200
cases for pro se litigants in 2002. More than 60
percent of the cases were disposed in less than 90
days.
State Representative Arthenia Joyner and Family Intake Unit, Anaida
Vizza, review standard packets of information for pro se litigants.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
9





KEY MESSA
GES
Assisting the judges in both the Family
Law and Juvenile Dependency divisions, the
Children's Justice Center staff supervised
an average of 140 visits each month.

Hillsborough County Security provided more
than 2,400 escorts or assistance to children
and transporters who utilized these supervised
visitation services. Written reports were CJC staff supervise more than 1,700 visits from Dependency and
provided to the judges more than 200 Family Law Divisions.
times during 2002. Video tapes of forensic
interviews and supervised visitations were
viewed at the CJC mor than 1,000 times.

Video tapes were released as evidence almost
Dependency Court Improvements
200 times.

Attorneys are now appointed at shelter hearings, thus allowing

time to become familiar with the case prior to arraignments,
The Model Dependency Court Program

Case management conferences and discovery are ordered to be
was established in 2001, as one of fi ve

held prior to the arraignments,
pilot programs across Florida. By design,

Guardians ad Litem are now appointed at the shelter hearing,
this program enhances judicial resources

for each child in foster care, and
to improve the manner with which cases

Pre-trial conferences, trial dates, and the initial judicial review
involving children alleged to be abused,

are set at arraignments.
abandoned, or neglected move through the
courts. The program provides General
Masters and Case Managers. Tracking was
implemented in the Spring of 2002.
In 2002, 325 Guardian ad Litem volunteers
served almost 1,700 children in the Juvenile
Dependency division. They contributed an
estimated 24,500 hours, which represents
an almost 40 percent increase from the
previous year. Based on the federal market
value guideline, these volunteers donated
almost $380,000 in donated services.
Child Custody investigators closed almost
70 percent of cases within 90 days of
assignment; more than half of the cases were
closed within 75 days. Investigators made
recommendations to the court regarding the
primary residential care in more than 95
percent of the cases.
Judge Essrig congratulates GAL Volunteer for diligent service to children in the
Dependency division.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
10










KEY MESSA
Florida currently has one of the largest proportions of older adults in the United States, and
just as with children and families, the courts are also responsible for protecting the elderly
and infi rm. In 2002, the court held more than 4,400 Annual Reviews of cases involving
guardianship.
Elder Justice Center staff reviewed more than 500 cases from the Guardianship Division
in 2002 and provided recommendations to the judge for court action when deemed
GES
appropriate. One-third of the cases resulted in greater judicial scrutiny. Preliminary results
of a University of South Florida study indicate 44 percent of wards had professional
guardians, while 31 percent had adult children who
were appointed as guardians. Others who served as
guardians included relatives, spouses, agencies, friends
and attorneys.
Primary Reason for Establishing
Guardianship
Case management services were also provided to almost
100 victims, representing a 40 percent increase in the
number of elderly served. More than 80 percent of the
Alzheimers/dementia
-
70.6%
victims were 65 and older and more than 50 percent

Chronic mental illness - 13.75%
were disabled. The primary reason for assistance was

Stroke - 4.6%
completing the Injunctions for Protection in domestic
Mental
Retardation
-
3.3%
violence cases.

Head injury - 3.3%
Supplementing judicial resources, a General Master
Other
-
4.6%
also hears cases involving the Guardianship and Mental
Health Division. More than 2,000 cases related to
mental health and substance abuse issues were also
heard in this division.
The court system touches all of our lives. Several
key points explain why our courts are so important
to each of us.


Our courts protect democracy.

Our courts safeguard victims' rights,

determine guilt or innocence of the accused,

and impose appropriate punishment.

Our courts resolve personal, business and

property disputes, and

Our courts protect children, families, the

elderly and the infi rm.
Judge Barton explains the importance of equal justice to
5th grade students.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
11












Circuit Court Judiciary









Circuit court judges hear all criminal and civil matters
not within the jurisdiction of county courts, including
Circuit Court Filings
matrimonial law, paternity cases, juvenile delinquency
and dependency cases, as well as mental health, probate,
guardianship and civil matters greater than $15,000. They
also hear appeals from some county court rulings and
judgments and from some administrative divisions.
There are nine divisions within the Thirteenth Judicial
Circuit Courts: Drug Courts and Sexual Battery and Child
Abuse Cases are included in the Criminal Justice & Trial
Division. Data derived from the Florida Supreme Court
Summary Reporting System (SRS) is listed for each division
on page 23.
Circuit court fi lings have increased more than 12 percent
during the last fi ve years.
0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000
Judges serving in 2002, and at the time of publication, are
2002
2001
2000
included in the pictorial directory. The Florida Legislature
1999
1998
has allocated 39 circuit court judges in the Thirteenth
Judicial Circuit.
James D. Arnold
Rex M. Barbas
James M. Barton, II
Emmett L. Battles
Herbert J. Baumann
Debra K. Behnke
Charles Ed Bergmann
Anthony K. Black
Kevin J. Carey
Martha J. Cook
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
12






























Circuit Court Judiciary
Marva L. Crenshaw
Jack Espinosa Jr.
Katherine G. Essrig
Ronald N. Ficarrotta
Barbara Fleischer
Robert Foster
William Fuente
Frank A. Gomez
Gregory P. Holder
Charlene E. Honeywell
Claudia R. Isom
William P. Levens
Perry A. Little
Manuel A. Lopez
Vivian C. Maye
Manuel Menendez Jr.
Richard A. Nielsen
J. Rogers Padgett
Sam D. Pendino
Daniel L. Perry
Denise Pomponio
Susan Sexton
Monica L. Sierra
Robert J. Simms
Ralph C. Stoddard
Chet A. Tharpe
Wayne S. Timmerman
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
13

















County Court Judiciary
County courts are sometimes referred to as "the
people's courts," probably because a large part
of their courts' work involves citizen disputes,
less serious criminal matters (misdemeanors),
traffi c violations and smaller monetary disputes
under $15,000.
There are four divisions within the county
courts, including an Emergency division that is
designed to streamline court functions related
to First Appearances in both circuit and county
criminal divisions. Data derived from the
Florida Supreme Court Summary Reporting
System (SRS) Report is listed for each division
on page 27.
The Legislature has allocated 15 county court
Judge Nazaretian dispenses justice with a little help from his friends.
judges for the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit.
Charlotte Anderson
James V. Dominguez
Gaston J. Fernandez
Walter R. Heinrich
Paul L. Huey
Joelle Ober
Elvin L. Martinez
Eric R. Myers
Nick Nazaretian
Art McNeil
Raul E. Palomino, Jr.
D. Michelle Sisco
Cheryl K. Thomas
Christine K. Vogel
Mark R. Wolfe
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
14










Supplemental Judicial Resources
General Masters and Hearing Offi cers
Michael Coffee
Roxie Crowell
Child Support
Family Law
State Representative Sandy Murman was joined by Hillsborough Kids Inc.,
Jeff Rainey, as they observed judicial reviews with General Masters Jon
Johnson and Joan Montagno presiding.
Marshall Farkas
Jon Johnson
Family Law
Dependency
Joan Montagno
Joe Navarra
Martin Proctor
Vicki Reeves
Dependency
Child Support
Family Law
Guardianship & Mental Health
County Judges on Special Assignment
Civil Traffi c Hearing Offi cers
Based upon authorization of Florida Statutes, Chief Judge Menendez
appointed several county court judges to serve as circuit judges to
Daniel L. Castillo

Vicki L. Kaufholz
address special needs and caseload dictates.
Bruce P. Cury


Lawrence A. Lempert
David
A.
Dee
Nancy
A.
Lorenzo

Judge Huey served in Family Law Division.
Maurice M. Feller

Kim K. Seavey

Judge Myers and Judge Palomino served in Family Law
William J. Foster

Bradley D. Souders

Division hearing Domestic Violence cases.
Donald R. Gillette

J. Benton Stewart, II

Judge Fernandez served in the Juvenile Dependency
Damon C. Glisson

Division.
Senior Judges
Senior Judges presided in court during
Horace A. Andrews

John P. Griffi n
vacancies more than 500 days in 2002,
Edward R. Bentley

Robert F. Michaels
refl ecting less than 10 percent increase
Richard
W.
Carr
William
A.
Norris
from the previous year.
Frederick A. DeFuria

Robert W. Rawlings
Daniel L. Gallagher

Harry Stein
John M. Gilbert

Ralph Steinberg
Roland Gonzalez
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
15


Administrative Office of the Courts
Organizational Chart

Circuit
Chief
County
Judiciary
Judge
Judiciary
Court
Legal
Administrator
Department
Chief
Deputy Court
Administrator
Court
Court
Court
Communications
Fiscal
Operations &
Central
Public
Facilities
Personnel
&
Affairs/
Mediation
Offi ce
Information
Resources
Technology
Purchasing
Programs
Services
Elder Justice
Circuit Civil
Help Desk
Center
Mediation
Guardian ad
Community
Litem Program
Mediation
Court Business
Center
Drug Court
County Civil &
Programs
Small Claims
Mediation
Children's
Dependency
Justice Center
Mediation
Court
Family Law
Interpreter
Mediation
Center
Juvenile
Family Intake
Diversionary
Unit
Programs
Indigent
Screening Unit/
Witness Aid
Center
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
16




Administrative Office of the Courts
While review of the information presented in the Key Messages indicates some of the Administrative Offi ce of the Courts' and the Legal
Department's programmatic efforts to support the judiciary and public, it is important to recognize the labor of the infrastructure that
allows judges to effi ciently carry out their constitutional responsibilities to adjudicate disputes presented to them and their constitutional
and statutory responsibilities for governance of the judicial branch. In addition to the Central Offi ce, the court administrator employees
seven senior managers to assist in the implementation of these statutory duties. By providing support services in the areas of executive
direction, judicial operations management and general administration, the courts can develop and implement policies and practices that
promote a justice system that is accessible, fair, effective, responsive and accountable to court users and to the general public.
Legal Department

While the Court Counsel represents and advises the judiciary in all legal matters, including ethics, trial procedure and judicial
administration, he also provides general advice to the court administrator and court program managers. Staff attorneys are assigned to
each judge to perform various legal research projects. The Legal Department prepared more than 100 administrative orders in 2002. The
heaviest workload is derived from the Circuit Criminal division, where there is a 2:1 ratio of judges and staff attorneys. Staff attorneys
in the Circuit Criminal division review all post conviction relief motions fi led by defendants, research the motions, prepare proposed
orders; and attend evidentiary hearings and prepare fi nal orders.
Administrative Office of the Courts
Call Volume by Hour
Hourly Volume Summary
Court Communication & Technology Services staff also assisted
judges and employees by responding to more than 11,400 requests
8 am - 9 am
through the Help Desk. Almost 40 percent of the requests were
closed at the fi rst level through telephone support.
9 am - 10 am
10 am - 11 am
6 am - 8 am
5 pm - 8 pm
4 pm - 5 pm
12 pm - 2 pm
3 pm - 4 pm
2 pm - 3 pm
Abdiel Ortiz introduces new technology to
Judicial Automated Data System (JADS Committee).
Representing 10 percent of the calls, Court Facilities staff
responded to requests associated with maintenance issues.
The other most common requests were related to printing,
Corel WordPerfect 9, passwords or Groupwise. These
departments must be accessible to judges and employees at
all times as indicated by the chart which reveals the hourly
volume summary for calls. More than 70 percent of the
calls were closed within one hour. In addition, all employees
were issued identifi cation badges during 2002 to assist with
security of the courthouse complex.
Court Facilities staff donned hard hats prior to touring the new
family and civil courthouse.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
17






Tallies by the Offi ce of Public Information
indicate that almost 37,000 "hits" occurred
on the web page each month. A special
section, Kid's Page, was unveiled for Law
Week and received more than 500 "hits" in
two weeks. The most requested pages on
fice of the Courts the site were consistently:

Information,

Forms,
and

Judges' Directory.
Administrative Of
People logged onto the courts website more than 30,000 times each month to
access information.
Kim Cash, Children's Justice Center, toured the courthouse with a
local Boy Scout Troop.
More than 2,000 students and chaperones trekked through the Halls of Justice in 2002 with the
assistance of volunteer tour guides from AOC staff. While the Offi ce of Public Information
organizes this public service, twelve new volunteer tour guides were recruited from court
programs to usher students around the courthouse, providing them with a "behind the scenes"
look at the justice system at work. Public schools represented the majority of visitors, but other
tour groups included Boy Scout Troops, private schools, the Centre for Girls, Martial Arts
Schools and Girl Scout Troops.
The Offi ce of Public Information also reports that 80 percent of the requests from media were
related to cameras in the courtroom. Assistance related to coordinating interviews and to Calvin Green responded to requests
provide information accounted equally for the remaining requests. Response time to requests from media.
was almost 100 percent resolution in less than two hours.
Fiscal Affairs continued to assist individual programs with budgetary information, as well as process more than 10,000 invoices, ranging
from Competency Exams to Dependency Attorneys to Court Reporters. Ninety percent of direct pay invoices were processed in less
than nine days.
Central Offi ce staff led efforts with the Performance Measures Team, which worked with program staff to develop signifi cant measures,
goals and benchmarks. In addition, staff led a project to automate administrative records for all programs.
Court Personnel Resources records indicate that 263 people were employed during 2002, serving 52 judges. During this time, Court
Personnel processed more than 1,350 attendance and leave transactions, as well as almost 200 benefi ts requests. In addition, almost
1,000 applications were processed, which resulted in 47 new hire orientations.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
18



2002 Highlights











U.S. Congressman Shines Light on Children's Justice
Mediation Week Pays Tribute to Exemplary Professionals
Center
In November, two mediators in this circuit received awards
Surrounded by media outside the Children's Justice Center,
for their contributions to this alternative dispute resolution.

Congressman Jim Davis
Recipients of the awards
praised the CJC as
embody attributes that are
"something that is out there
refl ective of two mediators
working." The congressman
who had more than 30 years
emphasized that, with much
of service combined. Ezelle
attention on the failures of
Alexander received the
the child protection system,
Joseph Klienbaum award
it is important to recognize
and Ricardo Woods-Obinna
programs like this one.

received the Robert Baker
Program Coordinator Trish
award. Through various
Waterman spoke to audiences
community activities
across the United States
organized by Mediation and
when interviewed about the
Diversion Services, we were
multi-disciplinary services of
reminded of the value of
the Children's Advocacy
confl ict resolution.
Center on National Public
Radio.
U.S. Congressman Jim Davis praised efforts outside the center with
Trish Waterman and Mike Bridenback.
9-11 Commemoration
More than fi fty judges and staff joined the community on Bayshore Boulevard,
the longest consecutive sidewalk in the world, where Tampa Bay was lined
with 11,000 American fl ags on September 11, 2002, to show the world that no
act of terrorism can diminish our patriotism or demoralize our spirit.
Great American Teach-In
Judges paused from dispensing justice in the courtrooms and walked into
classrooms across Hillsborough County, along with staff members, to teach
students about the court system.
Judge Espinosa
Lora Karas
Judge Essrig
Brad Kemker
Judge Evans
Edwin Lopez
Judge Honeywell
Paula MacDonald
Judge Nazaretian
Maritza Ortiz
Judge Nielsen
Maggie Pines
Judge Simms
Sara Prugh
Judge Tharpe
Jose Robles
Judge Thomas
Caryn Schiro
Gail Ellis
Pam Stokes
LeWanda Gaines
Valorie Tank
John Gleason
Rocky Valdez
Gail Holly
EJC Launched Initial Guardianship Training
Guardians gathered at Hillsborough County Community College in May and
again in September for the Initial Guardianship Training, which was taught by Denise Nix and "Elvis" hosted judges and court
Elder Justice Center staff.
staff prior to the Bayshore Patriots
commemoration of 9-11.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
19



2002 Highlights
Russian Judges Visit Tampa
Two delegations of Russian judges met with their American counterparts at both the State and Federal levels of court. With roundtable
discussions about legal practice in the Family and Civil divisions, opportunities were also expanded to include courtroom observation
and tours of the facilities. The visits were part of the Open World Program at the Library of Congress, which fosters mutual
understanding between people of the United States and the Russian Federation by giving young Russian leaders fi rst-hand experience
with America's democratic institutions and free-market system.
Ceremonies Mark Milestones for Graduates of Drug Courts
The fi rst offi cial Drug Division Graduation Ceremony was held on January 30, 2002, with Judge Donald Evans presiding. The
ceremony, organized by Drug Court Program staff, was held for people who had their probation terminated early, within the past 60
days. On March 1, 2002, Judge Florence Foster recognized 20 graduates in her courtroom.
Teen Court Awards
Juvenile Diversionary Programs honored Teen Court students and adult
volunteers, with assistance from State Attorney Mark Ober, who
presented the awards. The Hillsborough County Bar Association,
Young Lawyers Division, donated scholarships to two teen volunteers,
Erik Wagner of Tampa Preparatory School and Brandon Bognar of
the University of South Florida. Brandon and Gaither High Schools,
Tampa Catholic, Tampa Prep, Sligh and Wilson Middle Schools were
also noted for their local exemplary leadership in the Teen Court
Program. Local attorneys receiving awards for outstanding service
included Charles Inman, Public Defender's Offi ce; Jeff Bassett, Attorney
General's Offi ce; and Ben Stewart, Stewart Law Group.
Brad Kemker and volunteer Teen Court Judge Jeff Bassett
presented awards to Teen Court participants.
Bring Your Child to Work Day
Almost 50 children rode to work with their parents
on April 27, 2002, to learn more about the role that
they play in the court system. Court Personnel
Resources staff organized an "up-close" view of
a holding cell and tour of the courthouse, which
provided the children with an overview of how
the judicial system operates. Other activities
included a mock trial, with Judge Vivian Maye
presiding, a demonstration of the Tampa Police
Department Motorcycle Unit and MADD.
United Way Campaign Yields Pledges
Organized by Court Personnel Resources, the
annual drive raised almost $7,000 through payroll
deductions, one-time pledges and special efforts
- Friday Jeans Day and International Coffee and
Donut Sales.
Yasmin Arguelles and Tracey Wells volunteered to assist with courthouse tours.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
20



2002 Highlights
Elves for Elders
Collaborating with Aging Solutions, Inc. who provide
Public Guardianship services, the Elder Justice Center
recruited "elves" from across the courts to help
underprivileged seniors in Hillsborough County have a
brighter holiday season.
Roving Administrator Arrives at Romania
The Department of Justice, Offi ce of Overseas Prosecution,
Development and Training, called on Court Administrator
Mike Bridenback to join a team of experts to work with
local offi cials in Romania to improve court management
techniques in the new government. Upon his return to his
traditional job, almost 80 judges and employees gathered
in Courtroom 7, where he shared his observations of
Edna McKnight displays one of the tags used to identify wards'
a country struggling with democratic principles as they
holiday wish lists.
establish a judicial system.
Law Week Teaches Students about Equal Justice for All
Kids' Fest
Fifth grade students crowded into Courtroom 1 each day during
Judge Jack Espinosa and Drug Court Program staff joined in the
Law Week, beginning April 30, 2002, to discuss equality
annual festivities at the Lowry Park Zoo, where thousands of
of justice. Chief Judge Manuel Menendez, Public Defender
children participated in drug prevention related activities.
Julianne Holt and State Attorney Mark Ober set the precedent
for other members of the judiciary and representatives from
these constitutional offi ces, as they were present to answer
questions about their respective roles in the justice system.
Partnering with the Young Lawyers Division of Hillsborough
County Bar Association and the Hillsborough County Schools,
the Offi ce of Public Information organized the traditional
courthouse tours.
Like many judges, Judge Ficarrotta stepped off the bench to talk with the students, as illustrated in this photo.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
21



2002 Highlights
Justice Files Airs on Government Access Television
Collateral duty entailed both on and off camera talent by more than 100
judges and employees for the Offi ce of Public Information's monthly
production of the television magazine show, hosted by Brad Kemker,
Juvenile Diversionary Programs, and Lisa Davis, Children's Justice Center.
Topics ranged from small claims to jury duty to model dependency to
community partnerships.
NAB Connects to the Community
Community service work is an integral part of the restorative justice
practice, which holds young defendants accountable, but connects the youth
with the community. Over the summer, the newest Juvenile Diversionary
Program, volunteers from the Neighborhood Accountability Board and the
Home Builders' Association, constructed a wheelchair ramp for a disabled
resident and cleared abandoned lots in West Tampa, in partnership with
the City of Tampa's Solid Waste Department. They also prepared and
distributed backpacks and school supplies for elementary school students.
Public/Private Partnership Expands Supervised Visitation Program
While basic expenditures related to technology and security were included
in the budget, challenges to transform a government building into a child-
friendly environment required alternative funding sources. With major
contributions from the Children's Board of Hillsborough County, the
Brad Kemker and Lisa Davis hosted The Justice
Family Law Section of the Hillsborough County Bar Association, and the
Files, fi lmed at WUSF studios.
leadership of the Children's Advocacy Center Foundation, the community
support resulted in a spectacular place at the Children's Justice Center for
children and parents to interact while the court makes judgments about the
child's best interests.
GAL Awards Outstanding Volunteers
Program Coordinator Charlie Nelson
paid tribute to volunteers and supporters
at the annual recognition ceremony.
David Gerard received the Guardian
ad Litem of the Year award. Each
Juvenile Dependency division judge
also recognized individual volunteers.

In addition, several community child
advocates were honored, including Pat
Cook, Family Intake Unit, for her
sustaining support in the initial training
of volunteers each year.
Pat Cook receives tribute from GAL Program for assisting in volunteer training.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
22




2002 Highlights
Employee Recognition Ceremony Honors Accomplishments
2002 Award Winners
Quality of Excellence
Tradition continued with the annual recognition ceremony,
Tracy Ellis, Guardian ad Litem Program
which was designed to honor the accomplishments of staff
Helping Hand
devoted to serving their community. Eighty employees were
nominated by their peers for the nine awards presented by
Jose Robles, Court Facilities
Chief Judge Manuel Menendez and Court Administrator Mike
Innovative
Bridenback. In addition, service awards were presented to those
Trish Waterman, Children's Justice Center
who reached milestone anniversaries, as well as recognition of
Teamwork
employees who volunteered in the community as mentors.
Elves for Elders/Elder Justice Center:
Jennifer Branch, Marcia Larkin, Edna McKnight,
Kim Muga-Russo, Marla Smith and Judge Susan Sexton
Risk Taker
Rebecca Stafford, Court Communications & Technology Services
Visionary
Martha Merrell, Court Operations
Most Valuable Player
Lynn Riley, Mediation and Diversion Services
Tessie Rosete/Judicial Assistant
Denise Nix, Judge Claudia Isom
Employee of the Year
Rick Melendi, Court Programs
Leadership Award
Dave Rowland, Legal Department
Selected by the Chief Judge and Court Administrator, Dave
Rowland, Court Counsel, received the Leadership Award.
Senior Court Operations Consultant, Rick Melendi, accepted
the Employee of the Year Award, because he consistently
Retired Army Sergeant Jose Robles presented the
exceeds expectations in all work efforts and exemplifi es the
fl ag, while Retired Colonel Lamar Battles led
quality of the courts visions and values.
the Pledge of Allegiance during the Employee
Recognition Ceremony.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
23







2002 Highlights
Judges Retire from Public Service
After serving the citizens of Hillsborough
County, four judges retired from the bench
to return their attention to a new phase in
their lives. Each of them played a pivotal
role in the circuit and will be missed in the
courtroom. Best wishes for a bright new
future.
Judge Foster received recognition from Chief Judge Menendez for her dedication
to the courts.
Judge Donald
Judge Florence
Judge Cynthia
Judge Bob
Evans
Foster
Holloway
Anderson Mitcham
New Judges Delve into Public Service
Governor Jeb Bush appointed Judge
Michelle Peden to the county court and
Judge Frank Gomez to the circuit court
in 2002. In addition, Judge Kevin Carey,
Judge Martha Cook and Judge Monica
Sierra were elected to serve in circuit court
in November 2002. Chief Judge Manuel
Menendez instituted a new orientation
program for judges, which allowed them
the opportunity to become acquainted
with local organizational structure and
practices.
Judge Tharpe, Judge Thomas and General Master Vicki Reeves and her assistant, Joy
Casper, joined with newly elected judges, Sierra and Cook, on The Iron Triangle Tour
at the Florida State Prisons.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
24



Fiscal Summary
Revenue for the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit refl ects a diversifi ed budget, including funding from the State of Florida, Hillsborough
County, Fine & Forfeiture funds, local trust funds and grants. In general, the state budget operates on a continuous process and the
county works on a modifi ed zero base budget. The courts must operate its budget on two fi scal years; the state operates from July to
June, while the county operates from October to September. The fi nancial summary below represents the county fi scal year 2002.
From 1994-2002, the caseload increased almost 60 percent
but the entire budget increased only 50 percent. The rate of
Percent Growth from 1994 - 2002
growth in judges has not matched the caseload growth, so
to operate effi ciently, supplemental support was provided by
Hillsborough County. The county's portion of the budget
increase represents a 63 percent growth, while the state's
portion represents 37 percent.
While chief judges are constitutionally responsible for the
administrative supervision of trial courts, they found that
professional staff to assist with these responsibilities became
a neccessity as the modern court system became more
complex, fundamental constitutional rights became more
well-defi ned and case fi lings grew. For judges to focus on
the resolution of disputes they must deligate administrative
Judiciary
Caseload
responsibilities to full-time specially trained professionals
Budget
to assist in demonstrating accountability for improved
effi ciency and effectiveness.
State revenue accounted for almost 41 percent of funding
2002 REVENUE SUMMARY
for the circuit and county courts, while Hillsborough
County provided 21 percent. Fine and Forfeiture and
TOTAL REVENUE - $32,683,226
Local Criminal Justice Trust Funds swelled to 19 percent
of generated funds, representing another increase in
this category this fi scal year. State and Local Trust
funds represented 15 percent of revenue, while Grants
and Donations have grown to almost 4 percent.
State funding provides salaries and benefi ts of judges,
judicial assistants, and staff attorneys, as well as
positions in the Administrative Offi ce of the Courts,
including general masters/hearing offi cers, and juvenile
and family court support positions.
State Funds - $13,262,180
County funds provide operating expenses of judicial
offi ces and the Administrative Offi ce of the Courts. In
Hillsborough County - $6,956,860
addition, the county is the sole source of funding for
Fine & Forfeiture/Local Criminal Justice Funds - $6,269,191
programs, including the Court Interpreter Center and
Domestic Violence.
State & Local Trust Funds - $5,034,511
Grants and Donations - $1,160,484
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
25


Fiscal Summary
2002 EXPENDITURE SUMMARY
Total Expenditures - $32,683,226
Compensation for judges and staff accounts
for two-thirds of the budget. Court Personnel
Resources reports indicate 52 judges, each with
a judicial assistant, plus approximately 250 state
and county employees of Administrative Offi ce
of the Courts account for personnel expenditures.
More than 10 percent of expenses are applied
Compensation - $21,568,754
to costs for court-appointed attorneys and court
Court Appointed Attorneys and Court Reporter Costs - $3,641,167
reporters. Almost 22 percent of expenses are
Other Operating Costs - $7,148,234
associated with operating costs, while 1 percent
of costs are associated with capital equipment and
Capital Equipment & Court Improvements - $325,071
court improvements.
JUDICIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE OF THE COURTS PROGRAM BUDGET
PROGRAM

TOTAL
STATE OF FLORIDA
HILLSBOROUGH
TRUST FUNDS &








COUNTY

GRANTS
Court Administration
4,857,671
414,737
2,348,566
2,094,368
Court Communications
2,231,892
88,832
2,045,588
97,472
& Technology
Legal
1,086,601
589,010
497,591
Children's Justice
927,251
200,000
291,634
435,617
Center
Court Interpreter Center 394,152
394,152
Domestic Violence
430,000
430,000
Drug Court Programs
818,679
108,468
710,211
Elder Justice Center
276,914
101,204
175,710

Family Intake Unit
513,071
156,947
356,124
Guardian ad Litem

1,381,320
1,029,768
351,552
Juvenile Diversionary
58,009
358,956
71,564
Programs
488,529

Mediation and Diversion
23,700
2,048,225
Services
2,071,925
Model Dependency
119,659
119,659
Witness Aid/
635,351
Indigency Screening
635,351


Contract Attorneys
2,566,900
2,216,900
350,000
Court Reporting
1,560,960
1,535,960
25,000
Evaluations
680,538
61,738
568,500
50,300
General Masters/
984,826
531,150
453,676
Hearing Offi cers
Judges/Judicial
10,656,987
10,296,925
360,062
5,801,932
Assistants

TOTAL
32,683,226
13,655,243
13,226,051
5,081,932
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
26

Circuit Filings

FAST FACTS FOR CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURT DIVISIONS
342,373 cases fi led in 2002

Circuit Court Fast Facts
DIVISION

FILINGS DISPOSITIONS REOPENS OTHER
Criminal Justice & Trial
14,305
14,177
6,358
Post Conviction Relief Motions Filed 3,037
Probation Revocation Hearings
9,837
Bond Hearings


9,658
Adversary Preliminary Hearings
1,058
Family Law
20,805
19,277
3,974
General Civil
13,067
11,920
4,622
Appeals from County Court 82
Guardianship, Mental
5,579
5,657
4,835
Health, Probate & Trust
Juvenile Dependency
1,099
1,020
5,815
Foster Care Review

10,043
Shelter Hearings
1,193
Terminations of Parental Rights Field 222
Juvenile Delinquency
4,652
5,750
1,531
Detention Hearings

5,193
TOTAL
59,507
57,819
27,135
County Court Fast Facts
DIVISION

FILINGS DISPOSITIONS REOPENS OTHER
County Civil
31,165
28,324
8,494
County Criminal
39,729
unavailable
unavailable
County Criminal Traffi c
211,972
unavailable
unavailable
TOTAL
282,866
*SRS data is used as a base for workload measures for judges. This data is based on information received from the Clerk of Court and
is most accurate as of the run date of the report on April 9, 2003.
**The Clerk of the Court was unable to submit information on the County Criminal division to be included in the SRS data system due
to diffi culties with electronic transfer.
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
27


As the Wheels of Justice Turn
The courts play more than a symbolic role in American democracy.

The law provides a basis for resolving disputes of ordinary citizens,

guaranteeing equal access to the courts.

To learn more about how the Wheels of Justice turn

and how judges and staff in the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit serve Hillsborough County citizens,

Log onto our website at www.fl jud13.org
2002 ANNUAL REPORT
28



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